Improve Your Typing

For those interested in improving their typing (or learning to begin with) there is a great site called typing.com.

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This site is great, because while you may pay a fee to rid the site of ads, you may also take many lessons, from basic beginner to advanced, absolutely free. Additionally, you may practice to sharpen your skills as often as you like.

I advise you to sign up for the free account so you may keep track of your progress, which includes how you progress with increasing your words per minute and error rate.

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The display of all available classes is not only thorough and helpful, but you can choose any lesson in any skill level–you don’t have to complete the beginner lessons before you move on to higher skill levels, so if you just feel weak in a particular area you can go directly to lessons and practice for that area.

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When you choose your lesson you’re given an overview of what skill you’ll be measuring/practicing:

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This one is, obviously, for the u, r and k keys. Once you start typing it will begin measuring your error rate and typing speed.

Here’s a more basic one for the r and u keys.

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Once you complete the exercise you are given a score in this manner:

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You can also set up a teacher account, but I have to plead ignorance on that aspect of this site, as I have not explored it at all.

We type so often in this time of the internet, and especially as librarians we need to be able to type quickly and efficiently, so this site is a great way to keep our skills sharpened. It is also so user friendly, and free, that we may confidently recommend this site to patrons needing to improve their skills.

SPECIAL NOTE: Using the number pad is a much quicker, more efficient way to enter material item numbers, library card numbers and other long numbers. Check in this site for tutorials on how to best use the number pad and increase your speed and accuracy.

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What’s a MOOC?!

A MOOC is a Massive Online Open Course. The basic idea is that various institutes of learning will allow people to essentially audit courses for free, or even to pay a fee to gain various types of credit, from certificates, which have limited use, to actual college credit. Details vary according to who is offering the course, but the learner is the one who decides if they wish to learn simply for curiosity and the love of learning (most common) or if they want to earn some sort of certificate or some other validation of the time spent learning (less common).

There are several websites that specialize in hooking people up with such courses, with just a few being coursera.org, udemy.com and edx.org. You can find out so much about these courses and how they work at various sites around the web, but Forbes posted a good summary recently about the future of MOOCs. Additionally, you may find the following illustration helpful in understanding how an MOOC works:

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Basically this illustration asks several questions pointing out that the concept remains in the evolutionary stages despite being a web presence for quite some time. So, when you go to various outlets to experience an MOOC you won’t necessarily find the same experience as any other site. Some learners find this exciting, some frustrating. The MOOC doesn’t appear to be going away anytime soon, so, let’s look at how one in particular works.

I signed up for a course on coursera.org:

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As I became a registered, free user I was given limited access to class materials: I can follow along, complete readings and assignments but cannot take tests or quizzes or receive any sort of grade. To gain these features I would need to pay a fee to participate officially in Berklee College of Music courses. The fact that I have that option demonstrates one of the advantages of an MOOC–choice.

So, here’s just one example of what I can get for free: a video lecture from the teacher:

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As I progress through the course I will share the progress and, when the course is complete, I will give my opinion on how helpful (or not) I felt the course was.

Navigating the Thrills and Spills of Insurance

With all of the recent natural disasters you may have taken stock of your own home and thought about what you might do to replace items you might lose in such a scenario. Here is a helpful link from the site United Policy Holders that helps explain how you might go about dealing with such issues.

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United Policy Holders is a non-profit [501 (c)(3)] dedicated to helping consumers successfully navigate various types of insurance to make sure each gets the best deal and fair shake when it comes time to both buying and using insurance. Think of them as a sort of Consumer Reports of insurance.

In fact, here is their mission statement posted on the home page:

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Just to the right of the mission statement is a short list of broad topic areas covered on the site:

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Today let’s focus on what can be done in the event you have to make a claim on your property due to some sort of disaster. They have a detailed, step by step tutorial on how to successfully make claims to replace much of, if not all of, your damaged property here:

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They even offer tools to help inventory your household items in advance to avoid having to complete the arduous task after a disaster has struck. There is even an app to assist in the process, if you get into that sort of thing:
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Another helpful feature I found was an example of an actual letter sent to an insurance company requesting an extension on the time allowed to complete a claim:

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This site offers a wealth of information from which anyone may benefit because nearly all of us have insurance of one type or another. This site aims to help us identify how to proactively take advantage of all our insurance carriers promise and to avoid being taken advantage of by what can be a bloated, dense bureaucracy.