Helpful Medical Links That Go Deeper

Need medical information that goes deeper than or covers areas other than those covered by WebMD.com and the like?  Here are some more specialized sites for your consideration.

Should Your Child See a Doctor?

If you’re worried about your child’s health, this site will likely help you make a decision as to what to do next.  From the site:  “These guidelines (topics) are intended to help you determine how sick your child is and if you need to call your child’s doctor. Their second purpose is to help you treat your child at home when it is safe to do so.” (Emphasis mine)

Medline Plus

You may already be familiar with Medline Plus, as it is similar to WebMd and other health portals.  The distinction with this site is it is directly funded and informed by the federal government.  From the site: “Health professionals and consumers alike can depend on it for information that is authoritative and up-to-date. MedlinePlus has extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other trusted sources on over 975 diseases and conditions. There are directories, a medical encyclopedia and a medical dictionary, health information in Spanish, extensive information on prescription and nonprescription drugs, health information from the media, and links to thousands of clinical trials. MedlinePlus is updated daily and can be bookmarked at the URL: https://medlineplus.gov/. There is no advertising on this site, nor does MedlinePlus endorse any company or product.”

The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of John Hopkins Medical Center publishes a media center with videos and podcasts.  From the site: “Your video channel for cancer learning is a click away. Tune to the Kimmel Cancer Center’s YouTube channel to learn about the latest discoveries in cancer and education on cancer topics, including clinical trials, caregiving, finances, and social security. New videos are added periodically, so subscribe to the channel for instant updates.”

Foodborne Illness

Did you know that each year 1 in 6 of us will get sick due to contamination in something we eat or drink? Knowing how to avoid and/or treat these illnesses is important. The CDC is here to help. The CDC is a vast federal organization with a vast website, so it may be daunting for some.  The site on Foodborne Illness is full of helpful information and easy to use. From the site: “Foodborne illness (sometimes called ‘foodborne disease,’ ‘foodborne infection’, or ‘food poisoning’) is a common, costly—yet preventable—public health problem. Each year, 1 in 6 Americans gets sick by consuming contaminated foods or beverages. Many different disease-causing microbes, or pathogens, can contaminate foods, so there are many different foodborne infections. In addition, poisonous chemicals, or other harmful substances can cause foodborne diseases if they are present in food.”

Anatomy Atlases

The Anatomy Atlases are no joke.  Created by Dr. Ronald A. Bergman, Ph.D., who has taught anatomy at eminent universities for decades, it is a comprehensive and detailed anatomy atlas for use by doctors, students and various medical professionals, that can also be perused and used by laypeople. It lists as its mission: “To educate patients, healthcare providers, and students in a free and anonymous manner; For the purpose of improving patients’ care, outcome, and lives; Using current, authoritative, trustworthy health information; While serving as a platform for research into the challenges facing world-wide information distribution.”

Further, its goals are to “Curate a comprehensive digital library of anatomy information for patients and providers, Maximize the impact of this digital library by enhancing awareness among potential users at local, national, and international levels, Ensure an optimal educational experience through simplicity and clarity in design, and Lead the way to a better understanding of digital libraries through a process of on-going evaluation.”

Despite its free status this may be the most helpful, informative site out there concerning Anatomy.

Climate Change Indicators in the United States

https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2016-08/documents/climate_indicators_2016.pdf

The Environmental Protection Agency has put out a report detailing the effects of climate change on the nation. “Climate Change Indicators in the United States” “partners with more than 40 data contributors from various government agencies, academic institutions, and other organizations to compile a key set of indicators related to the causes and effects of climate change”, from the site. Previous editions of the report can be found here.

The report includes greenhouse gases, ocean temperature changes, weather anomalies, snow and ice melt, health effects, and ecosystem effects. Number of cases of lyme’s disease and west nile virus in the U.S. are also included. There is no index in the back of the book, but the table of contents is very inclusive.

A Report on Women and HIV/AIDS in the U.S.

http://kaiserfamilyfoundation.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/8436.pdf

This report, “A Report on Women and HIV/AIDS in the U.S.”, is released from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It provides statistics on women and HIV/AIDS in the U.S. including the number of new cases by race, geography, and age. Transgender, lesbian, and bisexual women are also counted. Some statistics on men are included. Insurance coverage, poverty, drug use, sexual abuse, and treatment programs are also listed. At the beginning of the report, a history of HIV/AIDS is shown from 1981 – 2013.

HealthStats

http://datatopics.worldbank.org/hnp/

From the website, “HealthStats is the World Bank’s comprehensive database of Health, Nutrition and Population (HNP) statistics. It includes over 250 indicators on topics such as health financing, HIV/AIDS, immunization, malaria and tuberculosis, health workforce and health facilities use, nutrition, reproductive health, population and population projections, cause of death, non-communicable diseases, water and sanitation, with background information on poverty, labor force, economy and education. Users can access HNP data by country, topic, or indicator, and view the resulting data (and wealth quintiles) in tables, charts or maps that can be easily shared through email, Facebook and Twitter.”

Shelby County Women’s Health Report Card

http://www.memphis.edu/crow/pdfs/2011healthreportcard.pdf

This site, provided by the University of Memphis Center for Research on Women, gives statistics about the state of women’s health in Shelby County, Tennessee. It shows statistics on reproductive health, wellness practices, sexually transmitted infections, chronic illness, and other health statistics.

Tennessee Health Reports

http://hit.state.tn.us/reports.aspx

Looking for a health report from the state of Tennessee? The Tennessee Department of Health has a one stop shop for all its reports. Reports on “Alcohol, Tobacco, and other Drugs Reports”, “Health Research Reports”, “Health Status Reports”, “Patient Safety Reports”, “Presentations”, “Surveys”, and “TN Kids Reports” are all listed.

Healthcare Blue Book

http://www.healthcarebluebook.com/

The Healthcare Blue Book website allows you to look at fair prices for health care in your area. Searches dealing with the cost of surgical and non-surgical hospital procedures, routine doctor tests,  lab tests, x-rays, cosmetic surgery, and even dental costs are included. Many other health care costs are also listed and a cost by zip code can be found.