Helpful Medical Links That Go Deeper

Need medical information that goes deeper than or covers areas other than those covered by WebMD.com and the like?  Here are some more specialized sites for your consideration.

Should Your Child See a Doctor?

If you’re worried about your child’s health, this site will likely help you make a decision as to what to do next.  From the site:  “These guidelines (topics) are intended to help you determine how sick your child is and if you need to call your child’s doctor. Their second purpose is to help you treat your child at home when it is safe to do so.” (Emphasis mine)

Medline Plus

You may already be familiar with Medline Plus, as it is similar to WebMd and other health portals.  The distinction with this site is it is directly funded and informed by the federal government.  From the site: “Health professionals and consumers alike can depend on it for information that is authoritative and up-to-date. MedlinePlus has extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other trusted sources on over 975 diseases and conditions. There are directories, a medical encyclopedia and a medical dictionary, health information in Spanish, extensive information on prescription and nonprescription drugs, health information from the media, and links to thousands of clinical trials. MedlinePlus is updated daily and can be bookmarked at the URL: https://medlineplus.gov/. There is no advertising on this site, nor does MedlinePlus endorse any company or product.”

The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of John Hopkins Medical Center publishes a media center with videos and podcasts.  From the site: “Your video channel for cancer learning is a click away. Tune to the Kimmel Cancer Center’s YouTube channel to learn about the latest discoveries in cancer and education on cancer topics, including clinical trials, caregiving, finances, and social security. New videos are added periodically, so subscribe to the channel for instant updates.”

Foodborne Illness

Did you know that each year 1 in 6 of us will get sick due to contamination in something we eat or drink? Knowing how to avoid and/or treat these illnesses is important. The CDC is here to help. The CDC is a vast federal organization with a vast website, so it may be daunting for some.  The site on Foodborne Illness is full of helpful information and easy to use. From the site: “Foodborne illness (sometimes called ‘foodborne disease,’ ‘foodborne infection’, or ‘food poisoning’) is a common, costly—yet preventable—public health problem. Each year, 1 in 6 Americans gets sick by consuming contaminated foods or beverages. Many different disease-causing microbes, or pathogens, can contaminate foods, so there are many different foodborne infections. In addition, poisonous chemicals, or other harmful substances can cause foodborne diseases if they are present in food.”

Anatomy Atlases

The Anatomy Atlases are no joke.  Created by Dr. Ronald A. Bergman, Ph.D., who has taught anatomy at eminent universities for decades, it is a comprehensive and detailed anatomy atlas for use by doctors, students and various medical professionals, that can also be perused and used by laypeople. It lists as its mission: “To educate patients, healthcare providers, and students in a free and anonymous manner; For the purpose of improving patients’ care, outcome, and lives; Using current, authoritative, trustworthy health information; While serving as a platform for research into the challenges facing world-wide information distribution.”

Further, its goals are to “Curate a comprehensive digital library of anatomy information for patients and providers, Maximize the impact of this digital library by enhancing awareness among potential users at local, national, and international levels, Ensure an optimal educational experience through simplicity and clarity in design, and Lead the way to a better understanding of digital libraries through a process of on-going evaluation.”

Despite its free status this may be the most helpful, informative site out there concerning Anatomy.

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Infotopia

http://www.infotopia.info/

From the site, “Infotopia is an academic search engine designed for “students, teachers, and especially homeschoolers.” Created by Dr. Michael Bell (former chair of the Texas Association of School Librarians) and Carole Bell (former middle school librarian and director of libraries), Infotopia uses a Google custom search to provide access to previously vetted websites selected by librarians, teachers, and educational professionals.” Infotopia provides tabs to different subject areas. These include: Arts, Biography, Games, Health, History, Images, Languages, Literature, Math, News, Reference, Sci/Tech, and Social Sciences. Under each tab, a topic can be selected from different websites, besides the Google-like search that can be done. Citation sources and search tips are also shown on the site.

Innerbody

https://www.innerbody.com/

Innerbody is a website that shows pictures of human anatomy. Each body system is broken down into parts. Click on the body system and a picture is provided in both 2D Interactive and 3D Rotate & Zoom. For 2D Interactive, hold the mouse pointer over the part of the body you are looking for. On the right side of the page, a box will pop up that explains what that body part does. Click on the body part and it gives a fuller description. For 3D Rotate & Zoom, click on the picture of the body part you are looking for. High resolution 3-D CAD views will come up, along with a  sound description. Also, the picture can be rotated to get a more accurate sense of the organ.

Bio-Image Search

https://lane.stanford.edu/bioimagesearch.html

From the site, “Bio-Image Search, developed by Lane Medical Library, serves up images and diagrams exclusively from medical and scientific organizations. It groups the results based on the degree to which their republication is restricted. The tool is available to anyone with Internet access.  It has access to more than 2 million images, and the librarians are hoping to add more.”

The website is useful to educators who need pictures or diagrams for their projects. The site will tell whether an image has re-usage rights, putting the images in four broad categories. The categories are: Maximum Reuse Rights, Broad Reuse Rights, Possible Reuse Rights, or Restrictive Reuse Rights. Each set of Rights has rules to go along with it. These are explained on the webpage. Human Anatomy and certain textbook images are also included. Searches are Google-like and can be done at the center of the page.

Creative Commons

http://creativecommons.org/

Want to see if a work is in the public domain? Is there something on the Internet that you would like to use yourself? The Creative Commons website is a great place to find out if you are able to use a picture, piece of music, or other source materials. Just go to the Creative Commons website and in the Explore Box click on “Find CC-Licensed Works”. In the top right corner is a google search like box. Just type in what you are looking for. Underneath the search box is a listing of different websites you can search. Click which website you would like to search in. For example,  if you type in bouvier des flandres, then click the Flicker website, lots of pictures of the dogs will come up. Click on one of the pictures. Underneath it will tell you the rights to the pictures and whether it is able to be used.  This can also be done in other picture websites, for other media, and music websites as well.

Internet Archive

http://archive.org/

The Internet Archive website provides free full access to out of copyright materials. Government documents, books, audios, moving images, and a music archive are all available to be viewed.  The content on the site is provided by any person or institution who would like their materials preserved.

On the site, the Wayback Machine is a place where old internet websites can be viewed and digital content can be saved. Over 150 billion pages are provided.

The Moving Images library has over 500,000 free movies, films, and videos. Educational and community videos are included.

The Live Music library provides over 100,000 items from over 5,000 bands. Live concerts that are strictly non-commercial are listed.

The audio archive and MP3 library lists over two hundred thousand free digital recordings, from concerts to news programs to book readings. Many of the audios are available for download.

The E-books and texts archive has over 3,000,000 fiction, popular books, children’s books, historical texts and academic books. Many use the Creative Commons licenses. Some international collections are also included.

These and many other libraries are listed on the website.

Biodiversity Heritage Library

http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/

From the site: “The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) is a consortium of natural history and botanical libraries that cooperate to digitize and make accessible the legacy literature of biodiversity held in their collections and to make that literature available for open access and responsible use as a part of a global “biodiversity commons.” BHL content may be freely viewed through the online reader or downloaded in part or as a complete work in PDF, OCR text, or JPG2000 file formats. ” Browsing is available by Title, Author, Subject, and Year. Searching can be done by Author, Subject, Scientific Name, and Book/Journal Title. The record or the full book can be viewed. More than 53,000 titles and 102,000 volumes can be browsed or searched, including over 1 million species. Rare scientific texts are also shown.