E-Tools You Can Use

A recent article in the Library Journal, cited below, has informed and inspired this post highlighting several useful e-tools.

C-SPAN Video Library

Do you want to see what the president said yesterday?  What about what the speaker of the house had to say about your pet issue?  The C-SPAN Video Library is the best place to begin searching for such content.  From the site: “…a way to archive and index the thousands of hours of congressional coverage produced by the network every year. The project quickly became one of the most comprehensive video archives of governmental and political content…”

Docteur Tweety

This site does charge a small fee, but it is useful to keep up with how your tweets are performing.

European Language Social Science Thesaurus

This site bills itself as “a broad-based, multilingual thesaurus for the social sciences” and is useful for those who do business within the European Union.

Google Translate Offline Capabilities

You can use Translate even when you’re offline, by taking a picture of the text in question.

The Internet Broadway Database

From the site:  “…the official database for Broadway theatre information. IBDB provides records of productions from the beginnings of New York theatre until today.”  So, it’s like imdb.com, but for theater.

Irish Films Archive

“The IFI Irish Film Archive acquires, preserves and makes available Ireland’s moving image heritage, working to ensure that Ireland’s rich and varied film history, both amateur and professional, is protected and accessible for the benefit of current and future generations. Film reels, digital materials and document collections are held in custom-built, climate-controlled vaults designed for the long- term storage of archival materials.”

Knoema

Knoema is full of helpful data on every country in the world.  “We discover, extract, and normalize data to make it usable through our open data platform. Knoema’s smart search engine moves beyond simple keyword search results to dataset discovery and auto-generated visualization collections to represent your data query.”

NewsNow

This is a UK based site, but you can personalize a free homepage with news from sources you prefer from sources all over the world.

Original article:

Price, Gary, and Henrietta Verma. “E-toolkit redux.” Library Journal, 1 Nov. 2016, p. S18+. Business Collectionhttps://goo.gl/bf4xWQ

 

Infotopia

http://www.infotopia.info/

From the site, “Infotopia is an academic search engine designed for “students, teachers, and especially homeschoolers.” Created by Dr. Michael Bell (former chair of the Texas Association of School Librarians) and Carole Bell (former middle school librarian and director of libraries), Infotopia uses a Google custom search to provide access to previously vetted websites selected by librarians, teachers, and educational professionals.” Infotopia provides tabs to different subject areas. These include: Arts, Biography, Games, Health, History, Images, Languages, Literature, Math, News, Reference, Sci/Tech, and Social Sciences. Under each tab, a topic can be selected from different websites, besides the Google-like search that can be done. Citation sources and search tips are also shown on the site.

Collections Search Center – Smithsonian Institution

http://collections.si.edu/search/

The Collections Search Center from the Smithsonian Institution allows a “search over 9.3 million records of museum objects, archives and library materials including more than 1.4 million online media files” (from the site). A Google-like search allows for a perusal of what is in the collections by keyword. Or, the Browse by Category button shows the Art & Design, History & Culture, and Science & Technology collections. A search can also be done for the items on exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution Museums.

Statistic Brain

http://www.statisticbrain.com/

Statistic Brain Research Institute provides statistics on all sorts of subjects. Financial, marketing, industry, company, demographic, geographic, crime, health, food, people, sports, media, technology, educational, and government are just some of the main header statistics that are listed. There are more subject listings under each heading. Or, a Google-like search box is also provided to do a statistics search. An example of a search for government information provides the Presidential Election Voter Statistics. The source of the information, a research date, a years’ range coverage (1952-2012), and turnout demographics with percentages are listed.

Pew Research Center

http://pewresearch.org/

The Pew Research Center provides an unbiased view of different issues that shape America. From the site, ” The center conducts public opinion polling, demographic studies, media content analysis and other empirical social science research.” Besides trending issues of the day, the topic index shows information on demographics, the economy, technology, legal issues and other subjects.

ifixit – the free manual that you can edit

www.ifixit.com

This website – ifixit – is a great place to look up repair manuals – and edit them yourself. The site includes step-by-step repair guides for computers, game consoles, cell phones, automobiles, cameras, ipads, ipods,  household appliances and other devices. Included in most manuals are pictures and diagrams. Explanations of the pictures are also available. There is also a place to ask questions and get answers to repair issues that you are not able to fix.

WorldWideScience.org

From Library Journal:

http://worldwidescience.org

“Developed by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information, this ‘Global Science Gateway’ allows one to search across 28 scientific databases from 18 countries.  An international collaboration, the site provides access to published research findings in energy, medicine, agriculture, environment, and the basic sciences.”  Simply type your query into the search blank to access information from all 28 databases.

Update:  The database has expanded to include 32 national databases and access to portals in 44 countries. [6/16/08]

Update: “Now you can find non-English scientific literature from databases in China, Russia, France, and several Latin American countries and have your search results translated into one of nine languages.” [7/8/10]